I have to admit to being a bit enamoured with Lily Allen at the moment. I’ve already blogged about her video for Hard Out Here, and today I’m sharing her new song, Air Balloon.

The clip was filmed in Cape Town, South Africa and features zebras and a cheetah, and I love it to bits. Honestly, its not my kind of music but everything that Lily does at the moment is SO much fun.

I love the lighting of this video, her clothes, the fact that she’s surrounded by four average looking blokes not a bunch of male models, and because…butterflies!

Then of course there’s Jesus nailed to the cross floating past at the very end. Well that’s enough to get everyone talking! Most people seem to believe that the song is about getting high (bright red toadstools growing behind her and a psychedelic feel sure point to that), but I believe Lily’s been quoted as saying it’s just a song about going to her happy place.

Music Feeds has this opinion: While the track is ostensibly a nursery-rhyme singalong pop tune about rising above the daily grind, it’s hard to definitively surmise whether Ms Allen is advocating day dreaming, or describing a Hunter Thompson-style vaporising high. Perhaps both. With lyrics like “we’re so high it can’t rain”, “”somebody remind me where I am, Miami or Timbuktu?” and the “trippin’, tri-tri-trippin’ now” refrain, we’ll let you make up your own mind …

Either way, it’s poppy and cheeky and so very Lily!

Director — That Go (Noel Paul and Stefan Moore) Producer — Sonya Sier 

“Don’t need to shake my arse for you, ‘cos I’ve got a brain” ~ Lily Allen, Hard Out Here

As this is my first blog on Music Vids, I thought I’d start with an fun and controversial clip. Lily Allen’s, Hard Out Here is one slick production that manages to be sexy, funny, satirical, cheeky (literally) glamorous and relevant all in a 4 min 23 second breath.

Idolator describes the clip this way: Allen has always been one of the few pop stars who’s capable of solid social satire without compromising her songcraft, and “Hard Out Here” doesn’t disappoint to that end: It’s a withering takedown of body image pressures and misogyny in the entertainment industry, making its point flawlessly with just a few choice lines and images. “Hard Out Here” is self-conscious and self-deprecating but stops just short of being caustic, built around an earworm of a chorus hook with typically smart, funny lyrics in the verses.

The controversy surrounding it was all tied up in cries of “racism” (because of the ethnicity of most of the back up dancers) and “class-ism”. But I’m not venturing into that miasma of opinion because I don’t for a moment believe that was either the intention or the outcome of the music video.

Lily Allen followed up the release with a statement to that effect: “If anyone thinks for a second that I requested specific ethnicities for the video, they’re wrong… If anyone thinks that after asking the girls to audition, I was going to send any of them away because of the colour of their skin, they’re wrong.The message is clear. Whilst I don’t want to offend anyone. I do strive to provoke thought and conversation. The video is meant to be a light-hearted satirical video that deals with objectification of women within modern pop culture. It has nothing to do with race, at all.”

Maybe I under-think everything, but personally, I thought the clip was both extremely clever and entertaining.The cry that Lily Allen has saved pop music, might be just a headline grab, but I do believe she’s at least having a damn good go at it, and I enjoyed the song a lot more than Pink’s Stupid Girls, which was in the same ball park–though even more blunt.

The Washington Posts’s rather snide closing remark in their review, “Allen is righteously targeting the patriarchal double standards of 21st-century celebrity culture, but issues of race and class get tangled in the crossfire…The video for “Hard Out Here” drives that critique home with Allen scrubbing a sparkly hubcap in a kitchen sink and dancing alongside a fleet of jiggly twerkers. But as the blogeratti prepare 1,000 think pieces, give the video the close-your-eyes test. You’ll hear a singer trying to spark a worthy discussion through a clumsy and bland pop song” kinda reeks of journalistic patriarchy and/or music snobbery.

Go get ’em Lily, I say!

Here is the video. Director — Christopher Sweeney (also directed Lana Del Rey’s, Young and Beautiful) Producer — Amalia Rosen-Rawlings Pro. Co. — Good Egg:

Followed by the making of the video where you get Lily UNCUT and bare-faced:

Followed by a round table discussion on Pop Trigger

You make up your own mind!

Awards

davitt-award  aurealis-award   logo-curtin-university

Peacemaker - Aurealis Award
Best Science Fiction Novel 2014

Curtin University Distinguished Alumni Award 2014

Transformation Space - Aurealis Award
 Best Science Fiction Novel 2010

Sharp Shooter - Davitt Award
Best Crime Novel 2009 (Sisters in Crime Australia) 

Categories

Archives

Search

Follow

Keep in contact through the following social networks or via RSS feed:

  • Follow on Facebook
  • Follow on Twitter
  • Follow on Pinterest
  • Follow on Google+
  • Follow on GoodReads
  • Follow on Tumblr
  • Follow on Flickr
  • Follow on YouTube